Nonprotected Wildlife and Species Deemed Destructive

Species not protected by law

The following species are not protected by law because they are non-native invasive populations with potential to damage property, pose a human health risk, and have detrimental effects on native wildlife.

  1. House (English) Sparrow
  2. European Starling
  3. Rock Pigeon
  4. Nutria

Species deemed destructive

The following species are deemed destructive to property and may pose a safety or health risk to people, livestock, and other native wildlife.

  1. Wild Hog

 

Manner & Means for Capture & Dispatch of Wild Hogs

Landowners may use the following methods:          

  1. Any weapon and ammunition legal for taking big game and small game during daylight hours only.
  2. Live traps with bait. Bait may not be used during big game hunting seasons without an exemption from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. All targeted animals must be dispatched before removal from trap.
  3. Additional methods may be authorized by obtaining an exemption from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. These exemptions may include:
    • The use of dogs as part of the experimental eradication program in Overton, Fentress, Cumberland, and Pickett counties. Dogs may not be used during November or December.
    • Shooting at night with the aid of artificial light, shooting over bait during big game season, or any other methods as approved by TWRA.
  4. Landowners who have hunting leases in effect as of September 15, 2011 may allow individuals authorized under the lease to assist in eradication efforts of wild hogs. Authorized lease members may use the following methods:
    • Any weapon and ammunition legal for taking big game and small game during daylight hours only.
    • Live traps with bait. Bait may not be used during big game hunting seasons without an exemption from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. All targeted animals must be dispatched before removal from trap.
    • If a landowner has obtained an exemption, authorized lease members may shoot hogs at night with the aid of artificial light, shoot over bait during big game season, or any other methods as approved by TWRA. Authorized lease members may also use dogs as part of the experimental eradication program in Overton, Fentress, Cumberland, and Pickett counties. Dogs may not be used during November or December.

      The authorization of lease members by landowners for wild hog eradication expires July 31, 2014.
       
  5. This Proclamation acknowledges the significant importance of Tennessee’s agricultural industry to the State’s economy and well-being. It is further acknowledged that wild, or wild appearing, hogs have a growing detrimental impact to this industry. In consideration of this, and noting in particular the challenges faced in dispatching wild hogs throughout a crop’s growing season, the Executive Director may authorize the use of alternative manner and means of dispatching wild hogs by Agency personnel and/or their representative to protect agricultural property from such impacts.
     

Licensed Big Game Hunters may use the following means:

  1. Individuals licensed to hunt bears may take wild hogs during any proclaimed bear-dog hunt.

 

Transportation of Wild Appearing Hogs

  1. The transporting of feral, wild or wild appearing hogs within the State of Tennessee shall not occur unless such movement meets the requirements as set forth by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
  2. The possession of hogs originating from the wild is prohibited.